Bombas Data Breach

2020-06-10 10:13:00

NOTICE: If you purchased Bombas socks between November 11, 2016 and February 16, 2017 and have received a NOTICE OF DATA BREACH, contact the Arnold Law Firm at (916) 777-7777.

white-hacked-signOn May 20, 2020, popular startup Bombas learned that malicious code in their e-commerce platform may have scraped personal information as customers purchased product online. The sock retailer reports that consumer data was exposed during a window from November 11, 2016 to February 16, 2017.

Compromised data includes:

  • Full names
  • Addresses
  • Payment card data

Bombas has not disclosed how many shoppers were affected by this cybersecurity incident. The company has notified victims of the breach and is offering two years of identity monitoring services at no cost. They also advise reviewing financial accounts and credit reports for fraudulent activity.

Shortly before the data breach, Bombas experienced a massive increase in daily orders, as a result of co-founders David Heath and Randy Goldberg appearing on a 5-minute “Good Morning America” segment in October 2016. Bombas had been handling up to 2,000 orders per day, a number that spiked to 26,000 after the television appearance.

Increased orders continued through the 2016 holiday season and beyond. Bombas now exceeds $100 million in annual revenues.

Unfortunately, this was not Bomba’s first data breach of customer payment information – nor its first delayed notification to consumers.

In 2019, the New York Attorney General’s Office announced that Bombas had agreed to pay $65,000 for failing to comply with the state’s data breach notification statute. In November 2014, Bombas discovered malicious code designed to steal payment card information from its e-commerce platform. The company waited almost two months to fix the problem, then mistakenly re-inserted the code into the website a few weeks later. Bombas failed to notify nearly 40,000 affected customers of the incident for more than three years.

Founded in 2013 and backed by “Shark Tank” star Daymond John, Bombas began by making comfortable, well-made socks with a “give-back” component to their business model. Bombas donates one pair of socks for each pair purchased to shelters, non-profits, and organizations dedicated to helping the homeless, in-need, and at-risk communities.

The company added t-shirts to their product line in 2019 and claims to have donated more than 38 million items to more than 2,500 community organizations.

If you purchased Bombas socks between November 11, 2016 and February 16, 2017 and have received a NOTICE OF DATA BREACH, contact the Arnold Law Firm at (916) 777-7777 to discuss your situation and possible legal options.